7 Ways to Visit Iqaluit as a Leader and Look Like You Care


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Despite having a population of "only" 7,700 people, the city of Iqaluit hosts more than its fair share of politicians and foreign dignitaries. Choosing to visit Iqaluit is one way that these leaders try to show that they care about Northerners and Northern issues. But coming up here for a few photo ops isn't always enough. Here are some things leaders can do to show (or at least look like) they really care.

1. Announce your visit ahead of time.

It's just common courtesy. We're busy, too.

2. Hold public events in accessible, inclusive spaces.

Justin Trudeau speaks to the crowd at a LPC-sponsored community feast. Photo by Anubha.

Justin Trudeau speaks to the crowd at a LPC-sponsored community feast. Photo by Anubha.

Hundreds of people lined up to meet Queen Elizabeth during her visit to Iqaluit in 2002. Photo from Nunatsiaq News.

Hundreds of people lined up to meet Queen Elizabeth during her visit to Iqaluit in 2002. Photo from Nunatsiaq News.

3. Answer questions from the public.

You know, those people that you apparently want to represent and who you're trying to get to vote for you.

4. Answer questions from the media.

We're not so scary.

5. Appreciate Inuit culture, fashion, or food with the community.

Gov. Gen. David Johnston tries the Inuit head pull competition with Johnny Issaluk. Photo from the CBC.

Gov. Gen. David Johnston tries the Inuit head pull competition with Johnny Issaluk. Photo from the CBC.

6. Pose for photos with the unselected randoms who take the time to come out to see you.

Nine times out of ten, they just want a selfie.

Justin Trudeau taking photos with his non-vetted well-wishers.

Justin Trudeau taking photos with his non-vetted well-wishers.

7. Meet with the people actually affected by or working on the issues you include in your speeches.

I'm sure there are many other ways leaders can show that they really care about Nunavut. Suggestions are very welcome; just comment below or send a tweet!